Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
MUSC 0050-040 College Music Program Michael Ketner Private study in voice, keyboard, strings, woodwind, brass, percussion, and non-western instruments. Such study is designed to meet the artistic, technical, and/or professional needs of the student. Note: This is not a syllabus. Course requirements and assessment will be determined by the private instructor. Private lessons in the College House Music cannot be taken Pass/Fail. Please visit http://www.sas.upenn.edu/music/performance. Students cannot register through Penn In Touch. Registration will be maintained by the music department upon receipt of application and instructor permission. An additional lesson fee will be charged to student account for participation in this program. Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-001 Ensemble Performance: Univ. Wind Ensemble Paul Bryan
Michael Ketner
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-002 Ensemble Performance: Univ. Orchestra Thomas Tok-Young Hong
Michael Ketner
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-003 Ensemble Performance: Jazz Combo Michael Ketner
Daniel M Paul
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-004 Ensemble Performance: Penn Baroque&Recorder Michael Ketner
Gwyn Meredith Roberts
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-005 Ensemble Performance: Collegium Musicum Margaret B Gruits
Michael Ketner
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-006 Ensemble Performance: Penn Chamber Music Soc Michael Ketner
Thomas E Kraines
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-007 Ensemble Performance: Penn Chorale Elizabeth Braden
Michael Ketner
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-008 Opera/Music Thea Wksp Margaret B Gruits
Michael Ketner
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-009 Arabic Choir Michael Ketner
Hanna A Khuri
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course).
MUSC 0070-010 Samba Ensemble Michael Ketner
Michael Lacheen Stevens
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-013 Penn Flutes Michele C Kelly
Michael Ketner
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course). Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0070-014 Arabic Percussion Adv: Arabic Percussion Advanced Michael Ketner
Hafez J Kotain
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course).
MUSC 0070-015 Arabic Percussion Beg: Arabic Percussion Beginner Michael Ketner
Hafez J Kotain
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course).
MUSC 0070-016 Arabic Choir Michael Ketner
Hanna A Khuri
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course).
MUSC 0070-017 Arab Music Ensemble Instrumental section Michael Ketner
Hanna A Khuri
Successful participation in a music department sponsored group. Ensemble groups: University Orchestra, University Wind Ensemble, Choral Society, University Choir, Collegium Musicum, Baroque and Recorder Ensemble, Chamber Music Society, Arab Music Ensemble, Samba Ensemble, Penn Flutes, Opera and Musical Theater, and Jazz Combo. This course must be taken for a letter grade (Pass/Fail registration option may not be utilized for this course).
MUSC 0100B-001 Marian Anderson Performance Program Michael Ketner Special instruction in vocal and instrumental performance for music majors and minors only. Students must demonstrate in an audition that they have already attained an intermediate level of musical performance. They also must participate in a Music Department ensemble throughout the academic year, perform in public as a soloist at least once during the year (recital), perform a jury at the end of the spring semester, and attend and participate in masterclasses. Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 0160-301 Black Jazz Experimentalisms in the United States Jasmine A Henry MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM From the paradigm-shifting sonic explorations of John Coltrane, Mary Lou Williams, and Kendrick Lamar, this seminar explores Black experimental jazz music-making to interrogate how musical experimentation is theorized, performed, and perceived among Black musicians in the United States. We will examine a variety of experimentation-driven musical practices in relation to twentieth and twenty-first century Black aesthetic principles, political ideologies, technological innovations, and social movements. Drawing from recent musicological scholarship, the term “experimentalisms” will be employed to illustrate the myriad ways experimental music-making is practiced and perceived beyond traditional Eurocentric interpretive frameworks. Through critical discussion, reading, and listening exercises, we will analyze how Black jazz and popular music experimentalists articulate broader sociopolitical and artistic concerns through their eclectic and heterodox approaches to music-making. Special attention will be given to the transformative, yet oft-silenced, contributions of Black women experimentalists such as Alice Coltrane and Linda Sharrock. Overall, this seminar offers insights on how to listen to and interpret Black jazz experimentalisms as a means of pushing beyond limiting notions of scientific and musical experimentation.

The primary goal of the first-year seminar program is to provide every first-year student the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small setting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics will be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College's First-year Seminar website for information on current course offerings http:/www .college.upenn.edu/courses/seminars/freshman.php. Fulfills Arts and Letters sector requirement.
Arts & Letters Sector
MUSC 0160-302 Audiovisual Climate Research* Jairo A Moreno TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM In this course, you will collaborate with your peers to create a public-facing, digital exhibit that communicates research about a local problem posed by the climate crisis. First you will encounter theories for communicating climate research in sounds, images, and embodied practices. You will apply these theories to analyze exemplary audiovisual projects. Then you will connect with your university’s digital scholarship librarian and visit a media lab to help you shift from theoretical to technical aspects of creating a digital exhibit and recording sounds and images.

After agreeing on a local climate problem that the exhibit will address, you will then form teams focused on creating different components of the overall exhibit: on the sound team, you might combine field recordings and recorded interviews into a short podcast episode; on the image team, you might create photo or video essays; on the education team, you might create public educational resources like DIY monitoring kits, reading lists, or create/improve relevant Wikipedia articles; on the interface team, you might link your skills in electrical engineering or environmental monitoring to build interfaces that connect bodies with real-time, local air quality measurements. Or you might devise an altogether different team in consultation with the professor.

The course culminates in a public showcase of each team’s contribution to the digital exhibit. You will share your projects with peers, faculty, project participants/interviewees, and other community members.

* Audiovisual Climate Research © 2022 by Andrew Niess

The primary goal of the first-year seminar program is to provide every first-year student the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small setting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics will be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College's First-year Seminar website for information on current course offerings http:/www .college.upenn.edu/courses/seminars/freshman.php. Fulfills Arts and Letters sector requirement.
Arts & Letters Sector
MUSC 0180B-401 Music in Urban Spaces Molly Jean Mcglone F 3:30 PM-5:29 PM Music in Urban Spaces is a year-long experience that explores the ways in which individuals use music in their everyday lives and how music is used to construct larger social and economic networks that we call culture. We will read the work of musicologists, cultural theorists, urban geographers, sociologists and educators who work to define urban space and the role of music and sound in urban environments, including through music education. While the readings make up our study of the sociology of urban space and the way we use music in everyday life to inform our conversations and the questions we ask, it is within the context of our personal experiences working with music programs in public neighborhood schools serving economically disadvantaged students, that we will begin to formulate our theories of the contested musical micro-cultures of West Philadelphia. This course is over two-semesters where students register for .5 cus each term (for a total of 1 cu over the entire academic year) and is tied to the Music and Social Change Residential Program in Fisher Hassenfeld College House which will sponsor field trips around the city and a final concert for youth to perform here at Penn, if possible. Students are expected to volunteer in music and drama programs in Philadelphia neighborhood public schools throughout the course experience. URBS0180B401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
Humanties & Social Science Sector
Perm Needed From Instructor https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=MUSC0180B401
MUSC 1300-001 1000 Years of Musical Listening Renee M Olo TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM We know that we like music and that it moves us, yet it is often difficult to pinpoint exactly why, and harder still to explain what it is we are hearing. This course takes on those issues. It aims to introduce you to a variety of music, and a range of ways of thinking, talking and writing about music. The majority of music dealt with will be drawn from the so-called "Classical" repertory, from the medieval period to the present day, including some of the 'greats' such as Handel, Beethoven, Mozart, Berlioz, and Verdi, but will also introduce you to music you will most likely never have encountered before. This course will explore the technical workings of music and the vocabularies for analyzing music and articulating a response to it; it also examines music as a cultural phenomenon, considering what music has meant for different people, from different societies across the ages and across geographical boundaries. As well as learning to listen ourselves, we will also engage with a history of listening. No prior musical knowledge is required. (Formerly Music 021). Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
MUSC 1300-002 1000 Years of Musical Listening Lloyd J Frank TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM We know that we like music and that it moves us, yet it is often difficult to pinpoint exactly why, and harder still to explain what it is we are hearing. This course takes on those issues. It aims to introduce you to a variety of music, and a range of ways of thinking, talking and writing about music. The majority of music dealt with will be drawn from the so-called "Classical" repertory, from the medieval period to the present day, including some of the 'greats' such as Handel, Beethoven, Mozart, Berlioz, and Verdi, but will also introduce you to music you will most likely never have encountered before. This course will explore the technical workings of music and the vocabularies for analyzing music and articulating a response to it; it also examines music as a cultural phenomenon, considering what music has meant for different people, from different societies across the ages and across geographical boundaries. As well as learning to listen ourselves, we will also engage with a history of listening. No prior musical knowledge is required. (Formerly Music 021). Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
MUSC 1300-003 1000 Years of Musical Listening Mary C Caldwell MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM We know that we like music and that it moves us, yet it is often difficult to pinpoint exactly why, and harder still to explain what it is we are hearing. This course takes on those issues. It aims to introduce you to a variety of music, and a range of ways of thinking, talking and writing about music. The majority of music dealt with will be drawn from the so-called "Classical" repertory, from the medieval period to the present day, including some of the 'greats' such as Handel, Beethoven, Mozart, Berlioz, and Verdi, but will also introduce you to music you will most likely never have encountered before. This course will explore the technical workings of music and the vocabularies for analyzing music and articulating a response to it; it also examines music as a cultural phenomenon, considering what music has meant for different people, from different societies across the ages and across geographical boundaries. As well as learning to listen ourselves, we will also engage with a history of listening. No prior musical knowledge is required. (Formerly Music 021). Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
MUSC 1322-401 Composers: Mozart/DaPonte Jamuna S Samuel TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course will center on the biography, works, and cultural context of a specific composer or group of composers. As well as introducing students to the musical works of the composer(s), the course will examine issues such as reception history, the canon, mechanisms of cult formation, authorship and attribution, identity, historical and social contexts, and nationalism and patriotism. Fulfills Arts and Letters Requirement. Mozart’s meeting with Lorenzo Da Ponte in Vienna in 1783 sparked one of the most successful collaborations in opera history between a poet and a composer, generating three works that are frequently staged in today’s theatres worldwide, The Marriage of Figaro (1786), Don Giovanni (1787), and Così fan tutte (1790). We will study the literary sources of these operas, the poetic and operatic conventions of the time, and the issues (such as love, power, and gender) that these works raise, by also comparing different versions on video. The course is intended for non-majors, but music majors are welcome. ITAL1322401 Arts & Letters Sector
MUSC 1400-401 Jazz Style and History Vincent D Kelley MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is an exploration of the family of musical idioms called jazz. Attention will be given to issues of style development, selective musicians, and to the social and cultural conditions and the scholarly discourses that have informed the creation, dissemination and reception of this dynamic set of styles from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Fulfills Cultural Diversity in the U.S. AFRC1400401 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
MUSC 1400-402 Jazz Style and History Amanda Scherbenske M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course is an exploration of the family of musical idioms called jazz. Attention will be given to issues of style development, selective musicians, and to the social and cultural conditions and the scholarly discourses that have informed the creation, dissemination and reception of this dynamic set of styles from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Fulfills Cultural Diversity in the U.S. AFRC1400402 Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
MUSC 1420-001 Thinking About Popular Music Jasmine A Henry MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Catchy yet controversial. Fun but hard-hitting. Popular music is not just entertaining: it presents societal issues, raises questions, expresses ideas. This course considers how popular music of the 20th century manifested the hopes, contradictions, ingenuity, and challenges of life in the United States, as seen and heard through the experiences of musicians and audiences. We will address three core questions: (1) How is “talent” and “good” music distinguished? (2) What happens when we treat music as “property,” especially with respect to broader ideas of ownership and credit? (3) When, how, and why is music considered dangerous? We delve into these questions by profiling musicians’ lives, analyzing the musical traits of specific repertoire, investigating changes in how music circulates, and situating popular music in U.S. cultural history. This course is not a chronological survey and does not aim to cover all U.S. popular music (or global popular music). Instead, each core question is addressed through case studies. Over the course of the semester students learn listening and analytic skills, how to engage critically with a range of writings about music, how to develop compelling arguments and articulate them verbally in class discussions and in writing assignments. Arts & Letters Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
MUSC 1420-002 Thinking About Popular Music Tyshawn Sorey W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Catchy yet controversial. Fun but hard-hitting. Popular music is not just entertaining: it presents societal issues, raises questions, expresses ideas. This course considers how popular music of the 20th century manifested the hopes, contradictions, ingenuity, and challenges of life in the United States, as seen and heard through the experiences of musicians and audiences. We will address three core questions: (1) How is “talent” and “good” music distinguished? (2) What happens when we treat music as “property,” especially with respect to broader ideas of ownership and credit? (3) When, how, and why is music considered dangerous? We delve into these questions by profiling musicians’ lives, analyzing the musical traits of specific repertoire, investigating changes in how music circulates, and situating popular music in U.S. cultural history. This course is not a chronological survey and does not aim to cover all U.S. popular music (or global popular music). Instead, each core question is addressed through case studies. Over the course of the semester students learn listening and analytic skills, how to engage critically with a range of writings about music, how to develop compelling arguments and articulate them verbally in class discussions and in writing assignments. Arts & Letters Sector
Cultural Diviserity in the U.S.
MUSC 1500-401 World Musics and Cultures Carol Ann Muller TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. AFRC1500401, ANTH1500401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
MUSC 1500-402 World Musics and Cultures Julia F Peters MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. AFRC1500402, ANTH1500402 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
MUSC 1700-001 Introduction to Theory and Musicianship Jairo A Moreno TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course will cover basic skills and vocabulary for reading, hearing, performing, analyzing, and writing music. Students will gain command of musical rudiments, including notation, reading and writing in treble and bass clefs, intervals, keys, scales, triads and seventh chords, and competence in basic melodic and formal analysis. The course will include an overview of basic diatonic harmony, introduction to harmonic function and tonicization. Musicianship skills will include interval and chord recognition, rhythmic and melodic dictation and familiarity with the keyboard. There will be in-depth study of selected compositions from the "common practice" Western tradition, including classical, jazz, blues and other popular examples. Listening skills--both with scores (including lead sheets, figured bass and standard notation), and without--will be emphasized. There is no prerequisite. Students with some background in music may place out of this course and into Music 170, Theory and Musicianship I. Fulfills College Formal Reasoning and Analysis Foundational Requirement. Formal Reasoning & Analysis
MUSC 1700-002 Introduction to Theory and Musicianship Brendan G Mcmullen TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course will cover basic skills and vocabulary for reading, hearing, performing, analyzing, and writing music. Students will gain command of musical rudiments, including notation, reading and writing in treble and bass clefs, intervals, keys, scales, triads and seventh chords, and competence in basic melodic and formal analysis. The course will include an overview of basic diatonic harmony, introduction to harmonic function and tonicization. Musicianship skills will include interval and chord recognition, rhythmic and melodic dictation and familiarity with the keyboard. There will be in-depth study of selected compositions from the "common practice" Western tradition, including classical, jazz, blues and other popular examples. Listening skills--both with scores (including lead sheets, figured bass and standard notation), and without--will be emphasized. There is no prerequisite. Students with some background in music may place out of this course and into Music 170, Theory and Musicianship I. Fulfills College Formal Reasoning and Analysis Foundational Requirement. Formal Reasoning & Analysis
MUSC 1700-003 Introduction to Theory and Musicianship Kristopher D Bendrick MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course will cover basic skills and vocabulary for reading, hearing, performing, analyzing, and writing music. Students will gain command of musical rudiments, including notation, reading and writing in treble and bass clefs, intervals, keys, scales, triads and seventh chords, and competence in basic melodic and formal analysis. The course will include an overview of basic diatonic harmony, introduction to harmonic function and tonicization. Musicianship skills will include interval and chord recognition, rhythmic and melodic dictation and familiarity with the keyboard. There will be in-depth study of selected compositions from the "common practice" Western tradition, including classical, jazz, blues and other popular examples. Listening skills--both with scores (including lead sheets, figured bass and standard notation), and without--will be emphasized. There is no prerequisite. Students with some background in music may place out of this course and into Music 170, Theory and Musicianship I. Fulfills College Formal Reasoning and Analysis Foundational Requirement. Formal Reasoning & Analysis
MUSC 1700-004 Introduction to Theory and Musicianship Susanna R Payne-Passmore MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course will cover basic skills and vocabulary for reading, hearing, performing, analyzing, and writing music. Students will gain command of musical rudiments, including notation, reading and writing in treble and bass clefs, intervals, keys, scales, triads and seventh chords, and competence in basic melodic and formal analysis. The course will include an overview of basic diatonic harmony, introduction to harmonic function and tonicization. Musicianship skills will include interval and chord recognition, rhythmic and melodic dictation and familiarity with the keyboard. There will be in-depth study of selected compositions from the "common practice" Western tradition, including classical, jazz, blues and other popular examples. Listening skills--both with scores (including lead sheets, figured bass and standard notation), and without--will be emphasized. There is no prerequisite. Students with some background in music may place out of this course and into Music 170, Theory and Musicianship I. Fulfills College Formal Reasoning and Analysis Foundational Requirement. Formal Reasoning & Analysis
MUSC 1999-001 Guided Research Individual research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 2500-001 Introduction to Ethnomusicology Carol Ann Muller W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This course introduces students to the field of ethnomusicology through a series of case studies that explore a range of traditional, popular, and art musics from around the world. The course takes as a point of departure several works of musical ethnography, musical fiction, and musical autobiography and, through in-depth reading of these texts, close listening to assigned sound recordings, and in- class case studies, generates a context within which to think and write about music. Prerequisite: Fulfills the requirements of the Music major.
MUSC 2710-001 Theory and Musicianship II Jamuna S Samuel TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Continuation of techniques established in Theory and Musicianship I. Explores chromatic harmony. Concepts will be developed through analysis and model composition. Musicianship component will include sight singing, clef reading, harmonic dictation and keyboard harmony.
MUSC 2710-101 Theory and Musicianship II Catherine B Chamblee WF 1:45 PM-2:44 PM Continuation of techniques established in Theory and Musicianship I. Explores chromatic harmony. Concepts will be developed through analysis and model composition. Musicianship component will include sight singing, clef reading, harmonic dictation and keyboard harmony.
MUSC 3200-001 Modular Electronic Music Systems & Performance Eugene Lew W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM MUSC3200 offers an introduction to electronic music/sound production with a focus on modular hardware systems and performance. Guest artists will join us for in-class visits and performances during the semester. Meetings will take place in the classroom, in concert spaces and in the studio. Preference given to Music majors and minors for registration.
MUSC 3300-401 Orpheus Uncovered: Italian Baroque Opera from Monteverdi to Gluck Mauro P Calcagno T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Classes under this number offer a more in-depth look at historical eras and topics or repertories associated with a specific period of music history. Classes will focus on one historical epoch (Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque). The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to engage deeply with musical objects, both historically and analytically, as well as to expose them to a range of methodologies with which to study music. Topics include: the Italian and English Renaissance madrigal; Baroque Opera 1600-1750. ITAL3300401
MUSC 3480-401 Gender, Sexuality, & Pop Music Maria E Murphy W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM How is popular music implicated in the representation, production, performance, and interpretation of gender and sexuality? How have musicians negotiated traditional categories of gender and sexuality? In this class, we will approach the study of popular music through the lens of feminist and queer theory, critical race theory, transnational feminist theory, and intersectional methodologies to articulate the ways in which gender and sexuality have shaped musical discourse and popular culture more broadly. Topics include: gay anthems, trans vocality, masculinities, boy bands, oral histories, queer electro-pop, afrofuturism, performance alter-egos, queer(ing) methods, cover songs, censorship, musical borrowings & cultural appropriation, the politics of representation, and affective modes of listening. Students will learn about and be able to articulate the values and ideologies that are communicated in various subgenres of popular music, and how musical production impacts our understanding of cultural practices and social systems. *No prior musical knowledge required.* GSWS3480401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=MUSC3480401
MUSC 3660-001 Performance, Analysis, History Natacha Diels M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Participation in the course may require an audition, see section details. This course must be taken for a letter grade (pass/fail option may not be utilized for this course). This weekly seminar will explore music from the past and present through class discussions of performance, historical or contemporary context, and analytical aspects of the music led by a professor and/or performer. One example of a class in this number will be an indepth study of chamber music repertoire led by the Daedalus Quartet. Students will prepare for a final performance at the end of the semester as well as a paper/presentation.
MUSC 3660 may be taken multiple times, but can only count once as a Music major elective, and no more than twice toward the major performance requirement. Please note that a course that counts as an elective may not also count toward the performance requirement.
MUSC 3800-301 Critical Birding: Music, Observation, and the Environment Glenda Goodman M 10:15 AM-1:14 PM Critical birding encompasses birds, birdsongs and sounds, birds’ environments, humans’ interest in birding, and the inspiration musicians take from birds. Focusing primarily on the nineteenth century to today, we will use birding explore the relationship between “nature” and “music.” First, composers and musicians have long listened to and imitated birds, and we will study a diverse repertoire of bird-based musical works. Second, birding itself has strong cultural and political significance, including for the history of conservation, of environmentalism, and of race in the United States. We will familiarize ourselves with these histories. Finally, birding offers an opportunity to critically consider the visual and aural practices of observation. We will engage in amateur birding.
This course meets once a week for three hours. It is a seminar-style discussion-based learning experience with some outdoor local birding activities.
MUSC 4097-001 Honors Thesis (sem1/.5 c.u.) Individual research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Guidelines for Honors Thesis can be found:https://music.sas.upenn.edu/ Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 4098-001 Honor's Thesis (Sem2/.5 c.u.) Individual research under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Guidelines for Honors Thesis can be found: https://music.sas.upenn.edu/ Perm Needed From Department
MUSC 4300-001 Music and Medievalism: The Reception of Medieval Music from LPs to Mp3s and Beyond Mary C Caldwell R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Music and Medievalism: The Reception of Medieval Music from LPs to Mp3s and Beyond 

What did music from the Middle Ages sound like? If we base our impressions solely on recordings and films, then the possibilities seem endless, ranging from serious, critical interpretations to raucous, rambling takes. In this seminar, we will examine medieval music from the perspective of modern recordings and renderings, from the earliest LPs to digital formats, television and film, and popular music. Beginning with a study of medievalism and how it relates to music, we will explore an array of topics related to how music from centuries past is interpreted, marketed, and even weaponized in contemporary (musical) cultures. Topics will include: medieval music as art music versus popular music; the appropriation of medieval music for political and social ends; debates around historical performance practices; technologies of playing and recording; discographies and editions; and the relationship of medieval music to film. As part of the seminar, we will visit the music library, the Kislak Center for Special Collections, and a recording studio, and will have visitors speak to us about recording early music, the history of recording technologies, and the creation of recording archives. Coursework will include readings, seminar discussion leading, reviews, and historical and critical writing projects. 

This is an advanced seminar, primarily for juniors and seniors who are prepared to engage deeply and critically with a specialized research topic. The topic of the seminar focuses on a particular genre or body of repertoire, music-maker or composer, or the cultural and social dynamics of a period in music history. The topic of the seminar is determined by the instructor.
MUSC 6663-401 Embodied Ethnographies: Performance Art, Ritual Performance and Poetic Praxis W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Led by composer, vocalist, librettist, experimental ethnographer and conceptual artist Imani Uzuri (she/they), this course will investigate embodied research modalities (from mundane to ethereal), performance praxis centering Blackness, Indigeneity, queerness and cultural practices outside of the western eurocentric gaze embedded with the politics of agency, marginality, identity, mythmaking, subversiveness and sacredness. During the semester, we will discuss practitioners of these modalities – both emerging and established, well-known and obscured –including artists such as Victoria Santa Cruz, Adrian Piper, Spider Woman Theater, Tehchieng Hsieh, Lorraine O' Grady, Marsha P. Johnson, Gladys Bentley, Ben Patterson, Aida Overton Walker, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, Juliana Huxtable, Marina Abramović, Cindy Sherman, Robert Ashley, Jasmine Togo-Brisby, Allison Janae Hamilton, Sister Gertrude Morgan, David Hammons, and Carrie Mae Weems. Students will also engage Uzuri’s own ritual performances, sound art and interdisciplinary works, which often deal with themes of ancestral memory, magical realism, liminality, Black American vernacular culture, spirituality and landscape (including her/their projects Wild Cotton, Come On In The Prayer Room, Hush Arbor: Wade (1, 2 &3), The Haunting of Cambridge, I Am Here (Black Madonna) and Conjure Woman).
The semester will culminate in students creating their own short ritual performances and/or experimental works using aspects of the various methodologies, healing modalities, research modes, multivalent texts and performance praxis explored throughout the semester. No performance experience is necessary.
AFRC3663401, AFRC6663401, ANTH3663401, ANTH6663401, GSWS3663401
MUSC 6700-301 Analytical and Theoretical Approaches Anna T Weesner M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM MUSC 6700 (622): Analytical and Theoretical Approaches In spring, 2023, this course will begin with consideration of various approaches to common practice tonality and follow threads through repertoires of both concert and pop music. We’ll consider a wide range of composers and musicians, including Mozart, Schubert, Schumann, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Kurtag, Ligeti, Weir, Abrahamsen, Cole Porter, Janelle Monae, Billie Eilish, Mitski, among others. We will take a kind of iceberg approach—straightforward surface with greater depths lurking below—to musical topics often taken for granted, taking up basic questions of form, such as the phrase and the cadence, smaller-scale notions, such as motive, hook, theme, and gesture, and larger concerns like style analysis and questions of tonality vs. non-tonality. Harmony will be our starting place, with other parameters, especially texture and rhythm, considered as a natural part of the mix. Simple composition exercises may be deployed from time to time in the service of analytical pursuits.

This course focuses on the analytical methods and theoretical approaches. Topics may include: the politics of listening; score-based analysis; social and critical theories; issues and politics of translation, inscription, and transcription; questions of form; the history of theory; performance studies; the history of musical notation; voice and vocality; and sound studies. Students will typically begin to put these methodological ideas into practice through a series of hands-on assignments which could be either individual or collaborative in nature.
MUSC 7200-301 The Sound of Music Natacha Diels T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course takes a practical approach to acoustics through the study of compositions that expand upon a particular property of sound in space. Students will perform repertoire and create original works inspired or based on these existing models. The class includes a basic study of utilizing audio computer programs in the service of recreating existing works and creating new works.

Seminar in selected compositional problems, with emphasis on written projects. See department website (under course tab) for current term course description: https://music.sas.upenn.edu
MUSC 7200-302 Music of Afrodiasporic Composers: 1965-2020 Tyshawn Sorey M 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Seminar in selected compositional problems, with emphasis on written projects. See department website (under course tab) for current term course description: https://music.sas.upenn.edu Perm Needed From Instructor
MUSC 7210-001 Composition Studio and Forum Natacha Diels W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Composer's Forum is a regular meeting of graduate composers, often along with other members of the Penn composing community, in which recent performances are discussed, musical issues taken up, and visitors occasionally welcomed to present their work or offer master classes. In addition to weekly Forum meetings, students will be paired with a composer for individual lessons in composition. Ph.d. Candidates in Composition in their third year in the program will continue non-credit participation in both forum and lessons.
MUSC 7210-201 Composition Studio and Forum Natacha Diels Composer's Forum is a regular meeting of graduate composers, often along with other members of the Penn composing community, in which recent performances are discussed, musical issues taken up, and visitors occasionally welcomed to present their work or offer master classes. In addition to weekly Forum meetings, students will be paired with a composer for individual lessons in composition. Ph.d. Candidates in Composition in their third year in the program will continue non-credit participation in both forum and lessons.
MUSC 7210-202 Composition Studio and Forum Anna T Weesner Composer's Forum is a regular meeting of graduate composers, often along with other members of the Penn composing community, in which recent performances are discussed, musical issues taken up, and visitors occasionally welcomed to present their work or offer master classes. In addition to weekly Forum meetings, students will be paired with a composer for individual lessons in composition. Ph.d. Candidates in Composition in their third year in the program will continue non-credit participation in both forum and lessons.
MUSC 7210-203 Composition Studio and Forum Tyshawn Sorey Composer's Forum is a regular meeting of graduate composers, often along with other members of the Penn composing community, in which recent performances are discussed, musical issues taken up, and visitors occasionally welcomed to present their work or offer master classes. In addition to weekly Forum meetings, students will be paired with a composer for individual lessons in composition. Ph.d. Candidates in Composition in their third year in the program will continue non-credit participation in both forum and lessons.
MUSC 7320-401 Opera as Theater, Object, and Script Mauro P Calcagno F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The seminar focuses on the L'incoronazione di Poppea (1643) as a case study. This music-theatrical work is approached as a historical object and as a script for today's performances/revisitations. In the former case, we will focus on methodological issues of authoriality, narrativity, and materiality; in the latter, on mediality, theatricality, and gender. Other case studies may be considered according to students’ interests. In addition, we will discuss historiographical and theoretical notions of “Baroque,” early modernity, postmodernity, performativity, reenactment, and the postdramatic. No Italian or musical notation knowledge is required; however, we will investigate early seventeenth-century Italy's literary and performance culture, and music-analytical approaches will be discussed if interest arises. Students in Music Studies and Composition are welcome, as well as those in Francophone, Italian, and Germanic Studies, the Program in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory, and those interested in early modernity and performance studies in general. For scheduling reasons, decisions regarding enrollment in this seminar must be finalized no later than the day after the first meeting (on 1/14).

Seminar on selected topics in the music of the Baroque period. The seminar explores musical genres (madrigal, opera, cantata, etc.) using poetic texts in Italian (primarily), French, and German, which circulated mainly in Europe in both private and public settings during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Issues of reception and performance/staging during the 20th and 21st centuries are also investigated. Each instance of the seminar has a focus, e.g.: Monteverdi’s madrigals, opera in seventeenth-century Venice and Paris, Guarini and Marino in music, histories of the madrigal, Petrarchism and music, the ”Baroque” in theory and practice, Handel’s operas, staging Baroque opera today, historically informed performance practice, etc. Please see department website https://music.sas.upenn.edu/course-list/ for current term course descriptions.
ITAL7320401
MUSC 7500-301 Contemplating the Field: An Intellectual History of Ethnomusicology Timothy Rommen R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This semester we will take a series of journeys together, each of which is aimed at developing our sense of the intellectual history of ethnomusicology. These journeys will be framed by matched sets of readings that illustrate not only the abiding issues that have confronted ethnomusicologists throughout the years, but also the changing terrain upon which solutions to those issues have been sought and articulated. We will be traveling along routes that variously explore travel writing, folklore, the comparative ethnomusicology of the Berlin School, anthropological connections, the beginnings of the Society for Ethnomusicology and some of its forerunners (like the International Folk Music Council [since 1981, called the International Council for Traditional Music]), and the definitional and methodological concerns that have animated and continue to (pre)occupy ethnomusicologists. Along the way, we will also have occasion to consider some of the theoretical and ideological shifts and concerns that our colleagues have confronted, negotiated, and defended over the years. Ultimately, these journeys will provide a framework within which to consider our own work—a contextual framework that will enable us better to understand the intellectual and political spaces within which we pursue ethnomusicology today. Finally, we will also invest a bit of time in reading together some very recent offerings by our colleagues with a view toward understanding how ethnomusicologists are currently (re)shaping and envisioning the field.

Topics in Ethnomusicology. Open to graduate students from all departments. See department website (under course tab) for current term course description: https://music.sas.upenn.edu